Tess was a precocious eight year old when she heard her Mom and Dad talking about her little brother, Andrew. All she knew was that he was very sick and they were completely out of money. They were moving to an apartment complex next month because Daddy didn’t have the money for the doctor’s bills and our house. Only a very costly surgery could save him now and it was looking like there was no-one to loan them the money. She heard Daddy say to her tearful Mother with whispered desperation, “Only a miracle can save him now.”  

Tess went to her bedroom and pulled a glass jelly jar from its hiding place in the closet. She poured all the change out on the floor and counted it carefully. Three times, even. The total had to be exactly perfect. No chance here for mistakes. Carefully placing the coins back in the jar and twisting on the cap, she slipped out the back door and made her way 6 blocks to Rexall’s Drug Store with the big red Indian Chief sign above the door. She waited patiently for the pharmacist to give her some attention but he was too busy at this moment. Tess twisted her feet to make a  scuffing noise. Nothing.  She cleared her throat with the most disgusting sound  she  could muster. No good.  Finally she took a quarter from her  jar and banged  it on the glass counter.  That did it!

     “And what do you want?” the pharmacist asked in an annoyed tone of voice. “I’m talking to my brother from Chicago whom I haven’t seen in ages”, he said without waiting for a reply to his question. 

     “Well, I want to talk to you about my brother,” Tess answered back in the same annoyed tone.  “He’s really, really sick … and I want to buy a   miracle.” 

     “I beg your pardon?” said the pharmacist. 

     “His name is Andrew and he has something bad growing inside his head and my Daddy says only a miracle can save him now. So how much does a miracle cost?”

     “We don’t sell miracles here, little girl.  “I’m sorry but I can’t help you”, the pharmacist said, softening a little.

     “Listen, I have the money to pay for it. If it isn’t enough, I will get the rest. Just tell me how much it costs.”

The pharmacist’s brother was a well dressed man. He stooped down and asked the little girl, “What kind of a miracle does you brother need?” 

     “I don’t know,” Tess replied with her eyes welling up. “I just know he’s really sick and Mommy says he needs an operation. But my Daddy can’t pay for it, so I want to use my money”.

     “How much do you have?” asked the man from Chicago.

     “One dollar and eleven cents”, Tess answered barely audibly.  “And it’s all the money I have, but I can get some more if I need to.

     “Well, what a coincidence,” smiled the man. “A dollar and eleven cents—the exact price of a miracle for little brothers.”

     He took her money in one hand and with the other hand he grasped her mitten and said, “Take me to where you live. I want to see your brother and meet your parents.  Let’s see if I have the kind of miracle you need.”

     That well dressed man was Dr. Carlton Armstrong, a surgeon, specializing in neurosurgery. The operation was completed without charge and it wasn’t long until Andrew was home again and doing well.

Tess’s mother and father were happily talking about the chain of events that had led them to this place.  “That surgery”, her mom whispered, “was a real miracle. I wonder how much it would have cost?”  Tess smiled. She knew exactly how much a miracle cost … one dollar and eleven cents … plus the faith of a little child.

A miracle is not ALWAYS the suspension of natural law, but the operation of a higher law. This is a true story I received by email 7 years ago.

CLICK BELOW TO:

Subscribe to In Search of Simplicity by Email

Radio host, inspirational speaker and health educator John Haines is the author of In Search of Simplicity: A True Story that Changes Lives, a startlingly poignant and inspiring real-life endorsement of the power of thought, belief and synchronicity in one’s life.

In Search of Simplicity is a unique and awe-inspiring way to re-visit and even answer some of the gnawing questions we all intrinsically have about the meaning of life and our true, individual purpose on the planet. I love this book.”

Barbara Cronin, Circles of Light. For the complete review visit: http://www.circlesoflight.com/blog/in-search-of-simplicity/

In Search of Simplicity is one of those rare literary jewels with the ability to completely and simultaneously ingratiate itself into the mind, heart and soul of the reader.”

Heather Slocumb, Apex Reviews

Advertisements

The following is from David Richo’s, Ph.D., book Unexpected Miracles: The Gift of Synchronicity and How to Open It (New York: Crossroads, 1998) www.davericho.com

Synchronicity is the phenomenon of meaningful coincidence. It is a resemblance, correspondence, or connection between something going on outside us and something happening inside us. In any ordinary coincidence, the events are connected by meaning rather than by cause and effect. This may not yet be synchronicity but simply synchronization. It becomes synchronicity when it makes a meaningful connection with our life’s purposes or helps unfold our destiny to show love, see wisely, and bring healing to ourselves and our world. All coincidences are connected by meaning, but synchronicity happens when the meaningfulness is relevant to our personal evolution. It is the spur of the moment in that it spurs us on and in that it may happen suddenly! It happens just in time. It is also just in time in the sense that it is part of the justice of the universe in bringing us exactly the pieces we need to fashion— or be fashioned by— our destiny.

Synchronicity is a word made from two Greek terms meaning “joined with” and “time.” Synchronicity is a bond or connection that happens in a timely way. A correspondence between two things is suddenly made clear. The unifying connection was always present but an immediate and meaningful coincidence makes it visible here and now.

Synchronicity thus combines an essential unity with an existential one. The eternal present makes an appearance in the momentary present. This is why it seems fitting to say that synchronicity guides us into spirituality.

Synchronicities cluster around significant events. Many meaningful coincidences occurred, for instance, when the Titanic sank and when Lincoln and Kennedy were assassinated. Personal disasters or crises in our personal life will also invite synchronicity. Norma orders a red dress for a party but a black dress is delivered to her. As she is about to phone the store to report the error, her sister calls: “Mother has died. Come for the funeral.” Norma thought she was in control of her life; she thought she knew what would happen next. The synchronous event told her otherwise and outfitted her for what was actually coming next: something much deeper was about to occur.

Synchronicity is the surprise that something suddenly fits! Synchronous events are meaningful coincidences or correspondences that guide us, warn us, or confirm us on our path. Coincidence happens at a specific moment. In this sense it is existential, tied to the here and now. Correspondences are ongoing. This is how synchronicity is essential, always present, to our human experience. Synchronicity is also found in a series of similar events or experiences. It can appear as one striking event that sets off a chain reaction. It is always unexpected and somehow uncanny in its accuracy of connection or revelation. This is what makes it impossible to dismiss synchronicity as mere coincidence.

Jung called synchronicity: “A non-caused but meaningful relationship between physical and psychic events….A special instance of acausal orderedness….Conscious succession becomes simultaneity….Synchronicity takes the events in space and time as meaning more than mere chance.” A coincidence is two unplanned events that happen simultaneously. It becomes synchronicity when it is connected by meaning. You and I love red roses. That is a coincidence. If unknown to each other, we meet as our heads bump while we are both smelling the same red rose that caught our eye at the same time and then later, we are married, that is synchronicity!

Synchronicity gives us a clue to the deep underlay of purpose and meaning in the universe and how that purpose is working itself out in our lives. Our own wholeness has a foundation and support in the larger order of things. All objective events have a corresponding subjective configuration in our psyche. Synchronicity is an instant instance of this correspondence. Its spontaneous timely events are articulations of the continuous nature of creation, intimations about the irrefrangible unity underlying it. Synchronicity is always striking and sometimes eerie. The “other worldly” feeling we have when it happens to us may be an indicator that an archetype is arising into consciousness from the depths of our psyche.

Things happen as they need to for the best purposes of the universe. Our belief that we can interfere with this is another trick of the arrogant ego. We may not know how what is happening right now really fits into our future. I can only trust that in addition to all I see, there is some other vision that will appear and make all this appear as just right.

Yet synchronicity cannot happen by any conscious intervention of ego since it is a phenomenon of grace: an entry of the transpersonal world onto our personal turf. It is a moment that manifests the unity that always and already existed between psychological and spiritual, mind and universe, you and me, me and everything. It occurs when our unconscious is ready for a step into wider consciousness. The ancient oracles were about precisely this!

The inner artist of our true Self uses two brushes: a conscious one: synchronicity, and an unconscious one: dreams. The synchronicities (meaningful coincidences) of our lives and the dream images that have most excited or stupefied us are the best— though often most ambiguous— clues to our self-actualization. When a dream confirms a movement in the psyche, that is itself synchronicity. Prayer that is answered is synchronicity since prayers that are answered are the ones that are consistent with our destiny.

Synchronicity is the special moment in which destiny summons us to move forward. It is the spur of the moment that initiates movement and may at the same time smart! This is the process by which archetypal reality incarnates itself in historical time: something unknown is doing we do not know what or why or through whom. Synchronicity really means that we are never alone in the universe. “O mighty love! Man is one world, and hath another to attend him,” wrote George Herbert.

Many psychic events do not occur instantaneously but undergo an incubation period in the unconscious. Something has not yet happened but is in the works. Synchronicity cuts across time-bound warps. It transcends the limits of being and becoming. This is because in the inner world there is no separation between past and future, time or timelessness, what is happening, what is about to happen, and what will happen. Only the present exists, which contains it all. In synchronicity, we meet our future—or our past—in our present. “To transform itself in us the future enters into us long before it happens,” Rilke wrote.

Synchronicity is the strikingly meaningful coincidence of two events or of a series of events. It can also be the coincidence of a psychic perception and a simultaneously occurring event as happens in ESP. Premonitions are in this category. In both ESP and premonition, the case can be made for synchronicity only if meaningfulness is present. This is always the ultimate criterion of synchronicity.

Synchronicity occurs in a dream that reveals what is already true or about to become true: Lincoln dreamed he was assassinated one week before the event. Dreams and astrology manifest many synchronous correspondences. There is immense synchronicity in the zodiac and our inclinations/choices. Rituals are forms of synchronicity in that they are outward enactments of corresponding inward graces.

Synchronicity appears in our work on ourselves. There may be synchronicity in the fact that our knowledge of our real issues—in ourselves and in our relationships—comes simultaneously with the strength to face them! We are usually in denial for a long time before we finally recognize and acknowledge our own truth. Synchronicity is in the fact that we often only let ourselves know when we can deal with what we know.

When we are ready to learn, a teacher appears. This is synchronicity. Occasionally a person, who died long ago or recently, comes to mind over and over in the course of a week or more. It could be that the meaning of that person in our life is coming home to us in a compelling way. Perhaps we learned something from that person and need to remember it now. Perhaps there is something we are now ready to learn. This may be another form of synchronicity. The face of the teacher/grandfather appears when the time has come to be instructed or to gain a deeper insight into who we are. This might even be the time to ask that person to be our guide from the other world if that fits our world view.

Synchronicity also occurs in looking back upon your life and seeing how it all prepared you or instructed you for the fullest fruition of your potential. A hidden feeling or truth waited to be awakened by just the right person or circumstance, sometimes painfully. My destiny had to have just such a beginning. My neglectful father helped me practice for the independent life I live now. My empty cupboard helped me care about starving children. James Hillman writes: “This way of seeing removes the burden from the early years as having been a mistake and yourself a victim of handicaps and cruelties; instead it is the acorn in the mirror….”

Everyone and every event in life’s drama is part of the metaphor of our journey. The issue from an old relationship may not be: “how bad he was” but: “how much I needed to learn!” Most of us keep meeting partners who show us exactly where our work is, e.g., men who abuse, women who are unfaithful. The wounds are openings into our missing life. Often, the only way a lost piece of ourselves or of our history comes back to us is through another person. The unknown is scary so people and events come along that help us go there. This is synchronicity. The only mistake we make is hanging on to some people too long or too briefly. How and with whom did I do that? We take them as literally themselves instead of as themselves and metaphorical forces, come to boost or chide. What delivered me from the constrictions into the open air? Who finally pointed the way beyond my limitations?

Finally, there is synchronicity in divination devices such as the I Ching or the Tarot: one ineluctably chooses the hexagram or card that coincides with one’s circumstance. This meaningful coincidence is based on the belief that the psyche will direct us to the exact information that we need when we need it.

IS IT FATE OR DESTINY?

The culmination of synchronicity is its direct revelation of destiny: the design of the whole universe works itself out in the display of each unique human life. “Life is a struggle to succeed in being in fact what we are in design…Our will is free to realize or not to realize the vital design we are but which we cannot change or abbreviate….” wrote Ortega y Gasset.

What we refuse to bring into consciousness, comes back to us as fate. It hits us from without when we refuse to heed its summons from within. It makes spiritual sense to forge a lasting agreement with the universe, which can only be an unconditional Yes to what is. Attention to synchronicity helps us join unfolding processes consciously. The word “design” adds the element of artistry!

Each generation presents to the universe a population of people who have just the right ingredients in them to make the world better. Each person is a crucial cell in this mystical body of humanity. There is synchronicity in the fact that here and now the world always has just the human resources that it needs to further its evolution as is fitting for this epoch. Nature participates in the same synchronicity by its drifts of species and seasons of growth and change in each era. It creates an ice age and a temperate age in accord with the over-all requirements of evolution. I am here at the right time— and just in time— for me to make my contribution and nature is supporting me by presenting just the conditions that promote this enterprise. And so are all the people in my life.

Destiny is often connected to career. Our work in the world is often our form of service or of actualizing our potential. Jonah is the biblical archetype of refusing one’s destiny. Since he was needed as a prophet, his refusal of the call to become one was disregarded. He was swallowed by a whale and forced to swallow his pride. There are also times in the course of life when refusals are allowed to stand and then “a great prince in prison lies,” as Donne says.

Jung said: “We find our destiny on the path we take to avoid it.” The greatest of human tragedies is to be distracted from our destiny and lose our power to activate our potential because of years of addiction to drugs, alcohol, or to relationships that are abusive, unworkable, or depleting. A great potential in us can thereby fade away and no one will do anything to halt the dissolution. The world will stand by as we throw away our fortune. We will stand by as we throw ourselves away. There is no guarantee that a whale will intervene for us as it did for Jonah or a tornado as it did for Dorothy. The challenge is to find our destiny in exactly what we are refusing to engage in. This is no easy task. It is hard to stop and look while we are running the other way! Is my destiny scribbled on parchment, twirled in a bottle and hurled into the sea, to be stumbled upon only long after I am gone?

How does chance figure in? Chance may simply be a playful way the universe has of collaborating with us in the working out of our destiny. Thus synchronicity integrates the irrational into an orderly pageant of evolution. The challenge is always the same: to believe in the artistic design in spite of the random display. The record shows us humans to be crassly ignorant and destructive but also touchingly responsive and restorative.

Perhaps Ghandi expressed this tension between our existential display and our essential design most accurately: “I see that mankind still survives after all its attempts to destroy itself and so I surmise that it is the law of love that rules mankind. “

Click Below to:

Subscribe to In Search of Simplicity by Email

Radio host, inspirational speaker and health educator John Haines is the author of In Search of Simplicity: A True Story that Changes Lives and the recently released Beyond the Search, books to lift the spirit and touch the heart. See http://www.JohnHainesBooks.com

In Search of Simplicity is a unique and awe-inspiring way to re-visit and even answer some of the gnawing questions we all intrinsically have about the meaning of life and our true, individual purpose on the planet. I love this book.”

Barbara Cronin, Circles of Light. For the complete review visit: http://www.circlesoflight.com/blog/in-search-of-simplicity/

In Search of Simplicity is one of those rare literary jewels with the ability to completely and simultaneously ingratiate itself into the mind, heart and soul of the reader.”

Heather Slocumb, Apex Reviews

 

Pohutukawa in Bloom on Coopers Beach

I love stories. I live for them and I love to share them.

It’s one of the main reasons I absolutely love interviewing guests on the radio. Everyone has at least one story that has the ability to inspire others.

In the last few days I’ve had a couple of encounters on the beach, meaningful encounters with the sharing of words and intention that have gone beyond the superficiality of many of the meetings we have in life. This too I live for—the meaningful encounter, the crossing of paths that seems somehow preordained in which the messages exchanged have importance and congruence with the issues and ideas we are busy with at the time.

As the sun was setting on another beautiful late summer day I found myself at the water’s edge, stopping from time to time to notice and absorb the rich and changing tapestry of colours painting the western horizon. It was warm and comfortable: shorts and barefoot weather. As is normal at this time of the day at this time of the year, there were precious few people walking the sand, perhaps six or eight on the entire 2.5 kilometre extent of the beach.

As I approached the centre of the beach where a small creek enters the sea, I met a couple I knew. The man, Rob, chants with me from time to time but we hadn’t seen each other in a couple of months. He mentioned he hadn’t been able to attend Lucia’s recent three day yoga retreat because of trouble with his back. I asked if this was a recent or ongoing problem.

His partner of twenty years, Lou, whom he has known since they were in school together, said, “It’s his disk, so it won’t get better.”

I put my hand gently on her shoulder and replied, “I beg to differ, but with the biology of beliefs, anything’s possible. We can change our DNA.”

Rob jumped in, “That makes me think of a story I heard recently; a true story. There was a prince (I don’t know where he was living) who had a deformed body. He called a servant to him and requested, ‘Find a master sculptor who can sculpt a perfect example of me and my body.’ The servant found such a sculptor and he immediately set to work making a life-sized full-colour statue of the prince without the deformities he’d been born with. The prince looked at and meditated on that sculpture every day and in time his deformities disappeared and he became the perfect form he envisaged.”

“Great story! One disk shouldn’t be a problem then, should it Rob?”

A couple of mornings later I was enjoying the first rays of the sun while taking photos of the shapes of trees that are formed in the sand when the tide retreats. Along came another couple I hadn’t seen for a few months. Somehow the conversation took a similar turn and the woman, Sue, began to tell the story of their youngest daughter, who is around twelve years of age.

“She had an injury on her lower leg which was interfering with her ability to dance and she loves dancing. The injury just didn’t seem to get better. She had a book about magic and one day she said to me, ‘There must be a way I can heal this thing, Mom. I’m going to find a way.’ She seemed certain she would find a way. So she went into her room, lit a candle and began to systematically go through her book looking for guidance. About half an hour later she came into the kitchen, quite excited. “Look Mom, it’s healed.” I looked at her leg and there was absolutely no sign of her injury. It was as if it hadn’t ever been there.”

We live in auspicious times. Jesus once said, “These things and more ye shall do also.” It looks like his prophetic words have come to pass. Will you embrace them? Will you accept your unlimited potential and your infinite capacity to heal? If this prince and this young girl can do it, surely you can too.

Click Below to:

Subscribe to In Search of Simplicity by Email

Radio host, inspirational speaker and health educator John Haines is the author of In Search of Simplicity: A True Story that Changes Lives, a startlingly poignant and inspiring real-life endorsement of the power of thought, belief and synchronicity in one’s life.